Module 2.

Getting Started

 

So we know why we want to change and we are motivated to make the change. We’ve learned that our identities, that is, the way we see ourselves is our most potent weapon when it comes to creating lasting change in our lives.

In the previous module, we learned that all habits consist of four layers, which are Cue, Craving, Response and Reward.

Also in the previous video, we learned that the first of these “Cue” is perhaps the least important for us in terms of achieving our goal of moving from a meat-and-dairy-based diet to a plant-based diet. This is because the cue is usually hunger, so it is not something that we want to replace.

Nevertheless, I think that we should take a closer look at this layer, not least because it will help us to understand habit change more fully and help to start to kick future habits.

Cues Can Be Automatic

Generally speaking, the most common cues or triggers are time or location related. Often we are not really aware of cues as they can become completely automatic.

If we think about the act of switching on a light for instance. The trigger is simply the fact that it’s dark and we can’t see. We don’t notice the cue; we just move in an instance through the “craving” for it to become light and “response” switch on the light. Our “reward” is predictable, we can see what we are doing.

We all need to eat to live. So we all experience the cue of feeling hungry. But often we eat for other reasons. Perhaps we are stressed, haven’t had enough sleep or are anxious. There are a number of reasons that we might eat even though we are not hungry.

Time To Take Stock

So maybe we are eating although we’re not hungry. We can use this opportunity to take stock of our actions. To become aware. Are you eating when you’re not hungry? If so, why?

One of the most beneficial aspects of the process of habit change is the opportunity it presents to become aware of our habits.

We could make a list of our daily eating habits. We can take stock of what we are eating, when we’re eating and why. We could even go a step further by making a note of whether we think that our food decision was positive, neutral or negative.

When we are unsure about how to classify each meal we should ask ourselves if it fits with the identity of the person that we want to become: so we should ask “Does this behavior help me become the type of person I wish to be?”

Time and Location

These are the two most common cues. Perhaps we can change the time that we eat or change the location. For instance, if we always stop for breakfast at the same café every morning, it would help us to change the café and the time at which we visit.

By doing this we avoid two ques, time and location, which are among the most powerful.

Using the example of the café, we would, of course, want to find a new café that has plenty of vegan options. And the good news is that there are far more of these than before.

1. Introduction  |  2. Identity Change  |  3. Make it Rewarding  |  4. How to Build Habits  6. The Best Way to Start  |  7. Environment  |  8. More on Environment  |  9. Make it Attractive10. Make it Unattractive  |  11. Role of Friends and Family  |  12. Momentum | 13. Make it Easy  |  14. Procrastination  |  15. Commitment Devices

About Module 2:

Before we find out more about switching to a healthy diet, it will help us a lot to learn about how habits are formed and, perhaps most importantly, kept.

I’m really excited about this module because it provides us with a tool for making changes in all areas of our life, not just diet and health. I promise that you’ll discover a lot of new ways of implementing changes in your life. This module will also help you to kick bad habits and create new ones.

Module 2.

Getting Started

 

So we know why we want to change and we are motivated to make the change. We’ve learned that our identities, that is, the way we see ourselves is our most potent weapon when it comes to creating lasting change in our lives.

In the previous module, we learned that all habits consist of four layers, which are Cue, Craving, Response and Reward.

Also in the previous video, we learned that the first of these “Cue” is perhaps the least important for us in terms of achieving our goal of moving from a meat-and-dairy-based diet to a plant-based diet. This is because the cue is usually hunger, so it is not something that we want to replace.

Nevertheless, I think that we should take a closer look at this layer, not least because it will help us to understand habit change more fully and help to start to kick future habits.

Cues Can Be Automatic

Generally speaking, the most common cues or triggers are time or location related. Often we are not really aware of cues as they can become completely automatic.

If we think about the act of switching on a light for instance. The trigger is simply the fact that it’s dark and we can’t see. We don’t notice the cue; we just move in an instance through the “craving” for it to become light and “response” switch on the light. Our “reward” is predictable, we can see what we are doing.

We all need to eat to live. So we all experience the cue of feeling hungry. But often we eat for other reasons. Perhaps we are stressed, haven’t had enough sleep or are anxious. There are a number of reasons that we might eat even though we are not hungry.

Time To Take Stock

So maybe we are eating although we’re not hungry. We can use this opportunity to take stock of our actions. To become aware. Are you eating when you’re not hungry? If so, why?

One of the most beneficial aspects of the process of habit change is the opportunity it presents to become aware of our habits.

We could make a list of our daily eating habits. We can take stock of what we are eating, when we’re eating and why. We could even go a step further by making a note of whether we think that our food decision was positive, neutral or negative.

When we are unsure about how to classify each meal we should ask ourselves if it fits with the identity of the person that we want to become: so we should ask “Does this behavior help me become the type of person I wish to be?”

Time and Location

These are the two most common cues. Perhaps we can change the time that we eat or change the location. For instance, if we always stop for breakfast at the same café every morning, it would help us to change the café and the time at which we visit.

By doing this we avoid two ques, time and location, which are among the most powerful.

Using the example of the café, we would, of course, want to find a new café that has plenty of vegan options. And the good news is that there are far more of these than before.

1. Introduction  |  2. Identity Change  |  3. Make it Rewarding  |  4. How to Build Habits  6. The Best Way to Start  |  7. Environment  |  8. More on Environment  |  9. Make it Attractive10. Make it Unattractive  |  11. Role of Friends and Family  |  12. Momentum | 13. Make it Easy  |  14. Procrastination  |  15. Commitment Devices

About Module 2:

Before we find out more about switching to a healthy diet, it will help us a lot to learn about how habits are formed and, perhaps most importantly, kept.

I’m really excited about this module because it provides us with a tool for making changes in all areas of our life, not just diet and health. I promise that you’ll discover a lot of new ways of implementing changes in your life. This module will also help you to kick bad habits and create new ones.